Golf en Argentina
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Information of Argentina
 
 
   History
   Origin of the word
   The clubs
   Blows and sticks
   The ball
   Other factors
   Glossary of the golf
   Argentinian Courses
   Buenos Aires
   Capital Federal
   Chaco
   Chubut
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   Tucumán
 
 
 
   Ski Resorts
   Argentine Wines
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   Capital Federal
   Buenos Aires
   Córdoba
   Santa Fé
   San Luis 
   Santiago del Estero
   Mendoza
   San Juan
   La Rioja
   Entre Ríos
   Corrientes
   Misiones
   Formosa
   Chaco
   Jujuy
   Salta
   Catamarca
   Tucumán
   La Pampa
   Chubut
   Neuquén
   Río Negro
   Santa Cruz
   Tierra del Fuego
 
The clubs

 

 

 

 

The golf club is made up by the shaft and the head. The shaft is a tube made of metal or graphite fiber, roughly 1/2 inch in diameter and between 35 to 45 inches long. The end of the shaft opposite the head is covered with a rubber or leather grip for the player to hold. The head is the part that hits the ball. Each head has a face which contacts the ball during the stroke, but in the case of a putter, the head may have two faces.

A player may carry and use up to fourteen clubs during a round. This set of 14 clubs is divided into two large groups: the woods and the irons.

 
Woods
 

The woods have large heads and bear this name because for a long time they had been made precisely of wood, but at present they are almost exclusively made of metal.

These are long clubs -they are between 40 and 45 inches long- and are used to make long shots. The wood one is generally known as a driver.

 
Irons
 
The irons have heads made of forged irons and sometimes chrome. They are used for shorter shots. They measure between 36 and 46 inches of length. Iron heads are typically solid with a flat clubface with a typical loft ranging between 16 and 60 degrees.
 
Formerly, each club was known by a distinctive name, but today most are designated by numbers. The woods are customarily numbered 1 through 7 and the irons 1 through 9. Some kinds of clubs have retained their distinct name, like the putter, for example. The putters are the most personal clubs. They come in a variety of head shapes and have a very low loft and often a short shaft. They are used to play the ball on the green, but may occasionally be useful for playing from bunkers or for some approach shots.

Other clubs that have kept their name are the wedges, which include the pitching wedge, the sand wedge, and the lob wedge, which are used for short-range shots in an attempt to place the ball on the green.

The choice of the clubs depends on the stroke to be made. The face loft is one of the factors to be taken into account in such selection, as it will determine the trajectory of the ball. A typical set of clubs may consist of irons 3 to 9, three wedges, woods 1, 3, and 5, and a putter.
Viajoporargentina - Información turística sobre la República Argentina
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